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DATE

Wed. May 24 -  1:00 PM

Highlands United Church, North Vancouver

Fri. May 26 -  7:30 PM

South Delta Baptist Church, Delta

Sun. May 28 -  3:00 PM

Anvil Centre, New Westminster

PROGRAM

MATINEE PROGRAM

EVENING PROGRAM

String Quartet in D Major, Op. 50, No. 6, “The Frog”

Joseph Haydn

I. Allegro

II. Adagio non lento

III. Menuetto: Poco allegretto

IV. Finale: Vivace

String Quartet in F Major

Maurice Ravel

I. Allegro moderato (F major)

II. Assez vif, très rythmé (A minor)

III. Très lent (B♭ major)

IV. Vif et agité (F major)

Piano Quintet in F Minor, Op. 34

Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)

I. Allegro non troppo

II. Andante, un poco Adagio

III. Scherzo. Allegro - Trio

IV. Finale. Poco sostenuto — Allegro non troppo

String Quartet in D Major, Op. 50, No. 6, “The Frog”

Joseph Haydn

I. Allegro

II. Adagio non lento

III. Menuetto: Poco allegretto

IV. Finale: Vivace

String Quartet in F Major

Maurice Ravel

I. Allegro moderato (F major)

II. Assez vif, très rythmé (A minor)

III. Très lent (B♭ major)

IV. Vif et agité (F major)

VIDEO

JANE COOP

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Pianist Jane Coop, one of Canada’s most distinguished artists, has toured extensively throughout North America, Asia and Europe, performing in such halls as Lincoln Center, Wigmore Hall, the Kennedy Center, Roy Thomson Hall, Salle Gaveau, the Singapore Cultural Center, and the Bolshoi Zal of St. Petersburg. She has collaborated with the principal orchestras of Canada, as well as the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra of London, the Seattle and Portland Symphonies, the Hong Kong Symphony, and the Radio Orchestras of Bavaria and Holland, in some forty concerti.

Ms. Coop has recently performed with orchestras in Toronto, Vancouver, Thunder Bay, Victoria and Halifax, and in the summer of 2008 participated in festivals in Maine, Tuscany and Provence. In the concert seasons since she has given concerts in Berlin, Oslo, New York, Shanghai, Taipei and British Columbia. She has received international praise for her 14 releases on the Skylark, CBC and Centaur labels in repertoire ranging from Bach to Barber. More information can be obtained by viewing the www.skylark-music.com site.

She has been a jury member at international piano competitions in Dublin, Maryland, Hilton Head, Calgary (Honens) and Washington DC. Ms.Coop is Professor of Piano and Chamber Music as well as Distinguished University Scholar, at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, and is a regular artist at the Kneisel Hall Chamber Music Festival in Blue Hill, Maine, performing with members of the Juilliard Quartet and other eminent musicians. She has collaborated with international artists in Canada, Europe, the USA and Japan, over the past thirty years.

In 2003, Jane Coop received the designation of Distinguished University Scholar by the UBC president. In December 2012, she was appointed member of the Order of Canada.

NOAH GELLER

Noah Geller comes to Seattle from the Kansas City Symphony, where he was Concertmaster since 2012. Prior to this, he held posts in The Philadelphia Orchestra as a first violin section member and later as Acting Assistant Concertmaster. He attended The Juilliard School for both his Bachelor and Master of Music degrees and has also performed with many chamber and festival organizations around the U.S. including the Marlboro Music Festival, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, Tanglewood Music Center, and here in the Pacific Northwest at the Olympic Music Festival in Port Townsend, Washington.

Geller and his wife, percussionist Mari Yoshinaga, and their dog, Monkey, reside in Seattle. He performs on a violin made by Andreas Postacchini c. 1840.

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EDUARDO RIOS

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Winner of the 2015 Sphinx Competition, 21-year-old violinist Eduardo Rios was born and raised in Lima, Peru. Eduardo began playing the violin at age ten and made his solo debut at age 14 with the National Symphony Orchestra of Peru. He made his American solo debut with the Houston Symphony and has also performed with the Nashville Symphony, Charlotte Symphony, Colburn Orchestra, Brevard Concert Orchestra, and the National Repertory Orchestra. He has worked with world-renowned conductors, including Carlos Kalmar, Tito Muñoz, Andrew Grams, Ken Lam, Geregely Madaras, and David del Pino.

Rios has participated in tours and festivals around the globe including the New York String Orchestra Seminar at Carnegie Hall, Aspen Music Festival, Festival de Música de Santa Catarina (Brazil), and Trav-eling Notes in Armenia. Upcoming festivals include a European Tour with the Youth Orchestra of the Americas where he will be concertmaster and featured as a soloist. Rios is pursuing an Artist Diploma with Robert Lipsett at the Colburn Conservatory of Music, where he is co-concertmaster of the Colburn Orchestra.

ANDY LIANG

A featured artist on NPR’s From the Top, violinist Andy Liang joins the Seattle Symphony as a member of the second violin section. After making his solo debut with the Oregon Symphony at the age of 11, Andy performed in Carnegie Hall, The Kennedy Center and Boston’s Jordan Hall by the age of 15. An accomplished violinist in solo, orchestral and chamber music playing, Liang is also a member of ALKALI, a fiery combination of string players/composers specializing in dynamic original compositions and covers infused with styles ranging from jazz to classical to pop. Liang recently received his Artist Diploma from the University of Texas at Austin as a member of the Cordova Quartet, the Young Professional String Quartet in Residence, where he studied with the Miró Quartet. Liang received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University where he studied with Cho-Liang Lin. In addition to playing the violin, Liang loves to play tennis, frisbee and video games.

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NATHAN CHAN

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Cellist Nathan Chan discovered his talent for music at an early age through conducting. Before he was two, he could emulate the styles of conductors he saw on music videos such as Seiji Ozawa, Herbert von Karajan and Leonard Bernstein, using a chopstick as a baton. As a toddler, his imitations were so intuitively musical that he caught the attention of San Francisco Opera Assistant Conductor Sara Jobin. Under her eye, he made his debut as a conductor at age three, leading the San Jose Chamber Orchestra in a set of Mozart variations, despite not yet being able to read music. This was followed by a guest appearance with the Palo Alto Philharmonic a year later, conducting the first movement of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony. Initially drawn to the sounds of low strings, he began formal music lessons with cellist Irene Sharp at age five. He later studied with Sieun Lin at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music.

Nathan Chan has performed as a soloist with the San Francisco Symphony, the Royal Philharmonic, Albany Symphony, Reno Philharmonic, and Hong Kong Chamber Orchestra, working with conductors such as Leonard Slatkin, James Gaffigan, Alexander Prior, Benjamin Simon, Donato Cabrera, Alasdair Neale, Edwin Outwater, Laura Jackson, and David Allen Miller, among others. He also participated in the Emmy-award-winning NPR program From The Top and NPR's Performance Today with Fred Child. In 2009, he was featured in The World’s Greatest Musical Prodigies, a three-part British series documenting a global search for talented musicians, in which Nathan and three other performers gave the world premiere of the Velesslavista Quadruple Concerto, composed by Alexander Prior. Nathan Chan has performed benefit concerts for the American Alzheimer's Association and the Friends of Children with Special Needs, among others. For his contributions to the community, he won the Peninsula Arts Council’s Ray Lorenzato Diamond Arts Award in 2007. In 2006, Nathan Chan appeared in The Music in Me, a documentary that aired on HBO and won the Peabody Award. This program led to a performance in Carnegie Hall and caught the attention of the legendary soul singer Roberta Flack, who invited Nathan to collaborate on her project of Beatles songs for Sony Records.

 

Nathan Chan was named a 2012 Davidson Fellow for his project entitled, "The Importance of Passion” and was awarded a $25,000 scholarship as part of this prestigious honor. While in New York City, he made his debut in Avery Fisher Hall (now David Geffen Hall) playing Haydn's Cello Concerto in C Major and with the Juilliard Orchestra performing Strauss' Don Quixote as the winner of the 2013 Juilliard Cello Concerto Competition, led by Maestro Leonard Slatkin. In 2015, Mr. Chan was chosen to participate in Classe d'Excellence du Violoncelle with world-renowned cellist Gautier Capuçon in association with Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris, France. Nathan won the 2015 Aspen Low Strings Concerto Competition playing Haydn’s Cello Concerto in D Major and was a recipient of the 2016 Samuel Mayes Memorial Cello Award at Tanglewood.

Nathan is a strong proponent of using technology and social media to attract others into the classical world and is committed to his fast growing Internet presence; to date, he has over 25 million views on YouTube, Instagram and TikTok. (@nathanchancello) During the COVID Pandemic, Nathan ran a fundraising campaign called “Nathan Chan Chats for Change”, raising funds for charities for social justice change, COVID relief and the Seattle Symphony. Nathan recently released his first NFT, collaborating with AI Artist Lia Coleman, combining classical music with machine learning art. Nathan’s 2022-2023 season includes a performance of Elgar’s Cello Concerto with the California Symphony, Tabakova’s Concerto for Cello and Strings with the Olympia Symphony, Shostakovich Cello Concerto with the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber Orchestra as well as a return to the Marlboro Music Festival as a 2021 participant.

Nathan received his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Economics at Columbia University and his Masters of Music with Richard Aaron at The Juilliard School. He is Seattle Symphony’s Assistant Principal Cello. Visit him online at nathanchan.com

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